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Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day is coming up. The normal hustle and bustle already started. Everyone’s clamoring to find the best gift. What the Mom in your life really needs isn’t more things (unless she’s asked for them of course, then please buy them for her)! She’ll appreciate the thought of these so much more.

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How to Decide if Working for Yourself is Right for You

How to Decide if Working for Yourself is Right for You

Working for yourself definitely sounds amazing. Everyone I’ve talked to about my new journey has thought the idea is wonderful. It’s easy to agree setting your own hours is a nice perk. I decide what projects to start, which projects to end, and what makes something “finished.” There are pros and cons to the whole process and some of the cons aren’t so obvious, so I thought it would be helpful to mention a few of each.

The benefits are most of what you hear people talk about when they say they work for or would like to work for themselves. The primary advantage is setting your own hours and deciding how much time to commit to each task. There’s no one telling you they need you to be available from 9 am to 5 pm. It’s likely you’ll find a lot of the things you need to do can be taken care of at 2 am just as well as 9 am. Your work can be accomplished in your pajamas… in front of a TV… with a glass of wine on the side table.

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Quitting My Job and Starting New

Quitting My Job and Starting New

I took a huge leap last week and put in my two weeks notice. My supervisor and I had both been putting off the decision hoping my son’s health would improve and I would be able to return to work. The kid has made tremendous progress but still falls short of where he would need to be to be placed in a childcare center with other kids his age.

I have mixed feelings about the whole thing. Keeping my job would have been my primary goal prior to having our son. Having a child didn’t change that significantly but there’s more to it than that. Now I have a child that REALLY needs me. It’s not a change of heart as much as it’s a change of circumstance. I didn’t know my son would have low muscle tone, a feeding tube, and feeding difficulties when we decided to have him. Now that I know, it simply doesn’t make sense to leave him unless there are no other alternatives.

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Big Plans for 2016

Big Plans for 2016

I recently dropped health, vision, and dental insurance at my job because they’re talking about switching me to a part time position. I asked them to wait until the end of the year and they were kind enough to do so, so I dropped insurance and my husband picked up insurance through his work during this year’s open season. In and of itself this wasn’t a big deal, but it’s put some things in motion that I wouldn’t have considered beforehand.

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10 Signs You’re a Parent of a Tubie

Thought some of you moms (and dads) would enjoy this. Please share it with others that need a smile.

  1. Some sounds will wake you out of a dead sleep and will probably continue to do so for a long long time, if not the rest of your life. The high pitched beeping of a medical grade pump, for instance.
  2. When you have to give medication to a child without a feeding tube, or they have a belly full of gas. You won’t really wish they have a feeding tube, but you’ll think for at least a brief moment you would be able to help them a lot more if they did.
  3. The idea of dropping your child off at daycare is foreign to you. If you leave your child with anyone, they’ve gone through at least several days of training to make sure the caregiver isn’t going to cause an emergency room visit.
  4. You don’t wait more than an hour to be seen in the emergency room, because if it’s not something the doctor would be willing to call ahead for you can take care of it yourself at home.
  5. You already know what’s wrong with your child when you take them to the hospital, but the hospital is the only place that can do the things you need done fast enough to prevent your child from developing complications.
  6. It’s no longer surprising when someone implies you’re a bad parent. “Obvious,” solutions for your child’s complex medical problem seem to flow from everywhere. Clearly all of the therapists and specialists you’ve been seeing for years are incompetent and have no idea what they’re doing. They couldn’t have possibly suggested these, “obvious,” solutions when you first started seeing them. It’s not like your child’s medical professionals have experience with these types of problems or anything.
  7. You know immediately whether or not a doctor or resident has read your child’s chart as soon as they walk in the room. They’d look a lot more terrified if they had.
  8. If an elective admission has to be pushed from June to July you ask to be called if there are any cancellations in June or to take care of it in September.
  9. By the end of the year, you haven’t had to pay out of pocket for medical services for at least three months, and for some as many as eleven.
  10. People tell you they don’t think they could ever handle the things you’ve been through with your child’s medical problems. You look at them like they’re crazy, because you can’t imagine anyone doing anything differently. There’s way too much love in your heart for that little angel to let them suffer a minute more than necessary.
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