Rough Patch, Part Four

Rough Patch, Part Four

Start here to read from the beginning.

We settled in to KKI but the vomiting didn’t stop. Our son stopped being able to keep anything down at all, even water. The nurses were insistent that he was keeping some down, but they weren’t with him all day. I was adamant they needed to do something but wasn’t sure what exactly that something would be. After the weekend the senior doctor returned and checked on us early in her rounds. She told us he looked OK but she was going to draw labs just in case. Once she received the results that would inform whatever our next steps would be. I settled down with my son for a nap and did my best to keep him comfortable while they worked out a plan.

Within an hour a skittish looking nurse came and woke me up. When I say skittish, her face was completely calm. Her eyes looked terrified. She told me we were being transported. “OK… can I take care of this when my son wakes up?”
“No,” she said. “They’ll be here any minute.”
“Oh… OK,” and I started packing things as quickly as I could. The nurse reassured me that they’d figure something out as far as the items we had to leave behind. I barely got everything shoved into a bag before our son was being woken and loaded up onto the stretcher for transport. Apparently his labs had shown a significant amount of dehydration, even though he didn’t appear dehydrated when examined.

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Rough Patch, Part Three

Rough Patch, Part Three

If you haven’t read the rest of the story yet, start here.

We loaded our son into the car and left for the hospital. It was dark and rain was pouring down throughout the drive to the emergency department. Check-in went quickly. Our son was exhausted and still showing signs of difficulty breathing so it didn’t take very long to be seen. A chest x-ray was ordered immediately and we were settled in to wait for the results. No one seemed particularly concerned so we did our best to relax and wait. We expected to be given antibiotics and sent home.

The nurse came into our room and asked in an unusually timid manner if our son had been seen at one of the other hospitals downtown. We explained a consult we had at one point with an interventional cardiologist, but that we only went once and that doctor recommended against running any tests. I mentioned to her off-hand that we had also done several second opinions at Hopkins. “Why do you ask?” was the next obvious question. Micro expressions danced across her face, all showing signs of discomfort, and she pointedly avoided eye contact. We were to be transferred and they were deciding where. The doctor would be in shortly to answer any other questions. With that she ducked out, having not made any additional eye contact.

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Rough Patch, Part Two

Rough Patch, Part Two

If you didn’t catch the first part, read it first.

We were waiting for many months for a call from Kennedy Krieger’s Outpatient Feeding Program. It’s not something I had mentioned previously; I wasn’t sure how helpful it would be. When the call finally came we were so excited. There was, however, a massive “but.” Our son had begun struggling with a new medical issue, ITP (Idiopathic Thrombocytic Purpora), and we weren’t sure how well he would do in the outpatient program given the need for weekly blood draws and hematologist visits. After speaking with the program’s nurse we concluded that, while difficult, managing his care on an outpatient basis was possible. If we were already actively in the outpatient program and he needed to be transitioned to inpatient they would do their best to have us transitioned to inpatient as quickly as possible.

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Hitting a Rough Patch

Hitting a Rough Patch

I was keeping up with everything. The laundry was washed, blog posts were getting written, and the house was clean. Looking at my blog, you might think I vanished into thin air. Those who followed me regularly were left scratching their heads, “what happened in June 2017?” I never forgot about the blog, or all of my readers. In fact, I missed you dearly. It’s time to share what brought me to a place I couldn’t post for a year.

Our son was doing well. All of his medical appointments were three to six month follow ups and keeping up with the house just wasn’t a challenge any longer. We found a daycare about ten minutes away willing to take a child with a feeding tube for four hours three times a week. They reassured us they were comfortable running his tube feeds, they had done it before for other children, and that they were able to give him the attention he needed. We had a plan and it was as solid as such a plan could be. With that, I took a part time job close to home. The arrangement was I would be in the office while my son was in daycare and work from home for the rest. I couldn’t have asked for a more flexible work arrangement.

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I’m Still Here

I apologize profusely for the silence. It’s not like me, and I’m disappointed in myself for letting it occur. I became overwhelmed approximately the end of November, and I’m only now getting my feet back under me. Again, I’m sorry.

A lot of things have happened in a month. I’ll stick to the highlights and keep this brief. Our son is beginning to do what most people would consider eating. He’s getting more confidence every day in his ability to keep food in his mouth and swallow it safely. A lot of us take it for granted – it’s never been a given for him.

We thought we would need to go in for a heart catheterization. The interventional cardiologist recommended against it because of the risk due to his bleeding concerns, and he wasn’t certain he would find any more relevant data than we already have. There is something concerning going on with our son’s heart, enlargement of one of the chambers, and there’s no apparent cause. So far he shows no visible signs of heart difficulty.

I haven’t forgotten you, and I hope to begin writing on a weekly basis again soon. Thanks for staying with me.

Noonan’s Syndrome and Heart Problems

Noonan’s Syndrome and Heart Problems

Sometimes children with Noonan’s Syndrome are born with heart problems or develop them early in life. Because of this and other unrelated concerns, we’ve monitored our son’s heart since before he was born. This past week I was thankful we did. It’s not otherwise apparent that one of his ventricles is growing at an unhealthy rate. We’re expecting a call from a surgeon any day now to place a catheter up through his leg to measure the pressures inside of his heart.

I’m told this sounds significantly scarier than it is. My husband knows at least one person who’s undergone this procedure multiple times. That’s not overly comforting when your two-year-old is the one going in. I’m terrified honestly. We’ve recently discovered he has Von Hildebrandt’s Type 1. If they need access to his vein, that’s clearly going to involve some bleeding. The medicine challenge they performed a few months ago didn’t last as long as it should have. While they’re not ruling it out – they want to try again after he turns three – that does mean he’ll need two different drugs to help him clot after the procedure is over.

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Feeding Problems and Speech Delay

Feeding Problems and Speech Delay

Our son has been trying to talk for a while now, and he tends to be reasonably understandable when he wants something. Every once in a while, he’ll even surprise you with a full comprehensible sentence — maybe once a month. It’s clear he understands complex thoughts and long sentences based on his response to instructions. So, what gives? Why is he not speaking clearly on a consistent basis?

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Unexpected New Roommate

Unexpected New Roommate

My Mother moved in with us last week. There was an open invitation, but it had been open for a while. She’s been invited down for at least a year and had been putting off moving in. She was hoping the problems that forced her hand would resolve themselves. They didn’t, and as they grew worse the push to make the transition finally overcame the effort required.

The first week was a little rough. Our son likes having my full undivided attention, and the cat wants the rest. Both of them were a clingy mess over the past week as they jostled for who would get me next. I’m so relieved the competition is coming to an end. I’m pretty certain no one is getting any less love or affection than they got before. I can only assume the anxiety of the moment drove the whole mess, and everyone is now content to be back where they were before. I guess I do have to admit, it was a lot of work to get my Mom settled. They might’ve had to sacrifice a little of my attention for me to help her get comfortable.

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Update – More Testing Needed

We went to the hematologist yesterday. They need to run more testing. According to the tests ran two weeks ago, our son does clot moderately slower than expected. They’re not sure why and the additional tests will hopefully provide some insight. Depending on the cause it may be easy to manage. I didn’t ask questions about what we’d need to do if it wasn’t easy. I don’t want to know unless I need to know.

It’s been tough for me because I wanted to believe I was wrong. I wanted with all my heart to believe I was paranoid and I had been nagging nurses to hold the gauze a little longer and check before they put the bandaid on after removing an IV for no reason. I wasn’t wrong. I’ve known for a long time he had this issue and while I chided the nurses to be cautious, I still denied to myself that there was a real problem.

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Update – A Rough Fall

No word yet from the doctor about the lab results which, frankly, is probably a good thing. About a week from now we’ll go back for an office visit and get the official word. If they haven’t called yet for additional testing they probably won’t. It’s still possible I might get a call but most likely there are no bleeding issues and the appointment will be straight forward. It’s definitely a relief not to have heard back with bad news even if there’s a small chance the call might still come.

The wound is healing. The kaleidoscope of colors has faded for the most part. Now he has a golf ball sized lump. While it looks bad, it’s almost reduced to the point you might expect it to happen from a random bump on the head. I’m looking forward to it going away entirely. With every bump and scrape, you get a funny look now and again from strangers. This particular injury has resulted in way too many uncomfortable encounters for my tastes.

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