Medical Identification (Medical ID)

I highly recommend anyone with a child who has complex medical issues or special needs purchase a basic medical ID. There are a lot of different kinds available. There are adjustable ones with velcro and watch bands. For the fashion forward there are adorable combinations of pink and blue bracelets. You can choose to engrave the details on a plate. Some have a pocket where there’s a little piece of paper you write on. Whatever method you choose, children with special needs and complex medical issues NEED a Medical ID.

Why? You might be incapacitated by the same thing that injured your child or your child might not be with you. Then…

  1. Drug allergies will not be discovered until the drug is administered.
  2. If your child has an implanted device, such as a shunt, no one will know to check right away if it’s been damaged.
  3. They may offer your child who silently aspirates food or drink.

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Last Day of Goodreads Giveaway

If you haven’t already heard, I’m giving away 10 free signed copies of my book Becoming a Medical Mom on Goodreads.
https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/160173-becoming-a-medical-mom
It has 3 five star reviews, 2 on Goodreads and 1 on Amazon.com. It’s an excellent resource for parents of kids who have medical needs (and I’m not the only one that thinks so)!

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Three Ways to Lift Your Spirits

This Thanksgiving was hard on so many. A lot of the people I know had a wonderful thanksgiving. We had a wonderful Thanksgiving. However, not everyone was so fortunate. Some of my fellow Moms spent Thanksgiving in the hospital away from their other children and their families. Others were left out because someone assumed they didn’t want to do something because of their child’s medical history. Still more were pulled into drama-filled situations for which they didn’t have the emotional strength to spare.

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The Nearly Impossible Task of Finding a Sitter

The Nearly Impossible Task of Finding a Sitter

Finding someone to babysit for a few hours is both the easiest and the most difficult thing I’ve ever done. Whenever I mention to a friend or co-worker I need a babysitter they  know a million and a half people who would LOVE the job. The excitement is palpable. They’ve clearly convinced themselves they know a 13-year-old whose minimally responsible enough to make sure a younger child in their care makes it through being babysat without a trip to the emergency room.

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A Special Bond

A Special Bond

Mothers frequently have a unique bond with their children. Something about being “Mom,” or “Dad” where he’s the primary caregiver, creates a connection with your child which cannot be broken. Mothers who adopt have it as well, as does anyone who serves as a child’s primary caregiver. The unbreakable tie between you and your child becomes stronger when your child has medical difficulties or special needs.

It’s not that these caregivers love their children any more than anyone else. It’s a strengthening which increases the sensitivity of both Mom and the child to the connection itself. It’s as if you can feel your child’s presence through a sixth sense. Their emotions are as clear as day. Personally, I frequently become tired when my son gets tired even if he shows no outward signs of fatigue. If I take a nap while he’s sleeping, I wake up around the same time he does.

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4 Ways to Encourage Independence

Children with medical needs or other special needs are heavily reliant on their caregiver in many cases. In the majority of situations, this is out of necessity and not preference. Most parents would love their children to be able to play on their own for a little while so they can take care of household chores, make phone calls, and take care of other tasks. I’ll share a few ways myself and other Moms I know have increased their child’s independence. I hope they work for you as well!

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Becoming a Medical Mom Goodreads Giveaway

Becoming a Medical Mom Goodreads Giveaway

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Becoming a Medical Mom by Ashley Bergris

Becoming a Medical Mom

by Ashley Bergris

Giveaway ends December 01, 2015.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

My book, “Becoming a Medical Mom,” is up for a giveaway on Goodreads. There are ten signed copies up for grabs, free with no strings attached. It’s basically a lottery system. As many people register as are interested. Ten of those will be selected by Goodreads and I’ll ship them a signed copy of my book.

This is the link: https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/160173-becoming-a-medical-mom

If you’d like to know more about the book, the easiest way is to click on the book’s title on the giveaway entry page. It was originally written with inexperienced medical moms in mind. However, I’ve been told informally that even veterans can gain some insight. I encourage you to at least check out the preview on Amazon.com if you’re on the fence. It’ll give you some insight into the topics the book covers. I linked to the physical book because that’s what you’re going to get if you win a copy in the giveaway. There is also a Kindle version.  I truly believe this book is helpful and fills a gap which no one else has addressed.

My Child is Sicker Than Yours

My Child is Sicker Than Yours

I ignore it as much as possible, but every once in a while I stumble across a conversation involving this awful competition. It goes something like this…

“My child has hypotonia…”
“Oh, so does mine! She also has a trach and a gtube”
“Well, he doesn’t just have hypotonia. We’ve been struggling with…”

The discussion continues. By the end, the entire world knows both children’s full medical history, even if they don’t know their first names. What on earth is the point?

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The Agony of Waiting

We’re waiting on exome sequencing results to come back for our son. They’re scheduled to come back early October. We’ve been waiting 12 weeks just for this test. We were waiting a little over a year for them to agree to run the exome sequencing because every other diagnosis had to be ruled out first. Depending on the test results, each specialist will make their recommendations. They’ve given no hint as to what they will recommend. They can’t, because we have no idea whether or not we’ll get a diagnosis much less what the diagnosis would even be.

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Mistakes and Five Tips to Avoid them or Minimize their Impact

Mistakes and Five Tips to Avoid them or Minimize their Impact

Everyone makes mistakes, and we all know that. We’ve been told a million times, “everyone makes mistakes, don’t beat yourself up over it.” That doesn’t quite help at the moment though, because the stakes are a bit higher than they’ve been in the past.

Forgot to turn on the pump last night? That’s less calories a continuously fed child is going to get, and it’s not hard to do. Even more common, your child rolls just the wrong way and disconnects himself from the pump. He doesn’t wake up because he’s exhausted, and you have no idea. When one of you finally wakes up, the bed has gotten all of the feeding and some stomach acid. You try to prevent it, but nothing is fool-proof. Besides, you can’t connect it too tight because it needs to release if your child gets tangled in the tubing!

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